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Research Seminars

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Weekly research seminars with external speakers. Experts from different fields of economics present their latest research.

To meet the speaker, please book a 30-minute slot in the calendar by writing your name and surname. Please remember that you can book up until the day before the seminar at 8pm.

Organizers: Emanuele Bacchiega, Antonio Minniti, Giuseppe Pignataro; logistics coordinator: Marco Magnani

Seminars and reading groups will start again in October


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Cognitive Reflection Predicts Decision Quality in Individual and Strategic Decisions

speakerDavid Porter (Chapman University)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15


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Who Benefits From Productivity Growth? The Local and Aggregate Impacts of Local TFP Shocks on Wages, Rents, and Inequality

speakerEnrico Moretti (University of California, Berkeley)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15


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Goals and Gaps: The Educational Careers of Immigrant Children

speakerPaolo Pinotti (Bocconi University)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15


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Multilateral and Costly Linkages between Emissions Trading Systems

speakerLuca Taschini (London School of Economics)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

paper download (with B. Doda and S. Quemin)


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Arbitrary Stereotypes Cause Gender Segregation in Labor Markets

speakerErnesto Reuben (New York University)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15


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The Value of Relational Adaptation in Outsourcing: Evidence from the 2008 Shock to the US Airline Industry

speakerGiorgio Zanarone (CUNEF Madrid)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

paper download (with R. Gil and M. Kim)


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Effect of Parental Job Loss on Child School Dropout: Evidence from the Occupied Palestinian Territories

speakerRoberto Nisticò (University of Naples Federico II)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15


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Regulating Cancellation Rights with Consumer Experimentation

speaker: Roman Inderst (Goethe University Frankfurt)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

paper download (with F. Hoffman and S. Turlo)


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Competition and Welfare Consequences of Information Websites

speakerAmedeo Piolatto (University of Barcelona)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15


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The Effect of Retirement on Cognitive Decline: Evidence from the Abolition of the Marriage Bar in Ireland

speakerIrene Mosca (Trinity College Dublin)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

paper download


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Globalization and Political Structure

speakerGino Gancia (CREi)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

paper download


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Some Recent Developments on Endogenous Spatial Growth Models

speaker: Giorgio Fabbri (Aix-Marseille School of Economics)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15


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Intelligence, Personality and Gains from Cooperation in Repeated Interactions

speaker: Eugenio Proto (University of Warwick)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

paper download (with A. Rustichini and A. Sofianos)

slides download


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Multidimensional Asymmetric Information, Adverse Selection, and Efficiency

speaker: Heski Bar-Isaac (University of Toronto)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15


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Okun’s Law and the Business Cycle

speaker: Paulo Santos Monteiro (University of York)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

paper download (with N. Kokonas)


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Racial Discrimination in the Sharing Economy: Evidence from a Field Experiment

speakerMichael Luca (Harvard Business School)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

paper download


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Asymmetric Information and the Securitization of SME Loans

speakerUgo Albertazzi (ECB / Banca d’Italia)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

paper download (with Margherita Bottero, Leonardo Gambacorta and Steven Ongena)


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Can Political Parties Change People’s Perceptions and Ideology?

speaker: Steven Stillman (Free University of Bozen-Bolzano)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

Abstract: This paper uses data from six waves of the New Zealand Election Survey along with longitudinal data from the Comparative Manifesto Project to examine how the ideology of political party manifestos affects both how individuals perceive the ideology of these parties and how they perceive their own ideology. To identify causal relationships, we examine how individuals react to changes in parties manifestos using longitudinal analysis. New Zealand is an ideal country for examining these questions as it has a unicameral legislature which is elected using a Mixed Member Proportional (MMP) voting system. In the period we study, between five and eight parties were in parliament. Hence, unlike in many countries that use First Past the Post voting systems, individuals are potentially well informed about the agendas of parties that cover a wide range of the political spectrum.


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Cash Providers: Asset Dissemination over Intermediation Chains

speakerJean-Edouard Colliard (HEC Paris)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

paper download (with Gabrielle Demange)


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Stereotypes and Beliefs about Gender

speakerNicola Gennaioli (Bocconi University)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

paper download (with  Pedro Bordalo, Katie Coffman, Andrei Shleifer )


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Cognitive Droughts

speakerAnandi Mani (Oxford University)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

paper download (with Guilherme Lichand)


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Supervisors and Performance Management Systems

speakerFabian Lange (McGill University)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

paper download (with A. Frederiksen and L. B. Kahn)


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Hiring through Networks: Favors or Information?

speakerYann Bramoullé (Aix-Marseille University)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15

Abstract: In many different contexts, connected candidates are more likely to be hired or promoted than unconnected ones. This may be due to favoritism or better information on candidates’ abilities. Attempts at identifiying both effects have generally relied on productivity measures collected after hiring. In this paper, we develop a new method to identify favors and information from data on hiring. Under natural assumptions, we show that observable characteristics have a lower impact on the probability to be hired for connected candidates and that this reduction precisely captures the information effect. We then show how to recover biases due to favors from overall shifts in hiring probabilities. We apply this new method on data on academic promotions in Spain. We find weak evidence of information effects and strong evidence of favoritism. These results are consistent with those obtained from later productivities.


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Investing in Cooperation

speaker: Alessandro Gioffré (Goethe University Frankfurt)

seminar room, 14.00-15.15


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Chasing the Key Player: A Network Approach to the Myanmar Civil War

speaker: Andrea Di Miceli (UCLA, Anderson School of Management)

paper download

seminar room, 11.00-12.30


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